Seven or More Yorkshire Cathedrals and Minsters

Top Cathedrals for age and Architecture

1.York Minster Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of St Peter is the Mother church of the Province of York AD 627.

2. Ripon Cathedral Church of St Peter and St Wilfrid AD 655.

Parish and modern Cathedrals

3. Bradford Cathedral Church of St Peter 15th century

4. Leeds Roman Catholic Cathedral Church of St Anne

5. Wakefield Cathedral Church of All Saints consecrated AD 1329

6. Sheffield Cathedral Church of St Peter and St Paul  + like Liverpool with a second cathedral the 7. Roman Catholic Cathedral Church of St Marie

8. Middlesbrough  Saint Mary’s Roman Catholic originally Cathedral Church of Our Lady Of Perpetual Succour

Minster Churches not Cathedral?

  1. Beverley Minster Parish church of St John and St Martin
  2. Dewsbury Minster All Saints Church
  3. Marsden St Bartholomew’s church
  4. Halifax Minster West Riding
  5. Howden Minster was owned by monks from Peterborough Abbey in Saxon times
  6. Leeds Minster and Parish Church of Saint Peter-at-Leeds
  7. All Saints Church, Rotherham, also known as Rotherham Minster,
  8. Doncaster Church of St George, Doncaster, also known as Doncaster Minster.

Significant or Greater Churches Network

Southwell Cathedral and Parish Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary prior to the dissolution of 1539  was a Minster in the diocese of York.

  • Bolton Abbey
  • Bridlington Priory
  • St Peter’s Church, Harrogate
  • Holy Trinity Church, Hull
  • Selby Abbey

The greater church network aims to help former monastic properties and others  large parish churches built at a time of great wealth. They have common problems of financing facilities for a large number of visitors and the specialist maintenance and repair of old or large buildings.

 

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Even Older Yorkshire Folk from the Stone Age

The first Yorkshire folk were from the Palaeolithic era over 10,000 years B.C. These 12,000 year old Fred Flintstone characters were able to cross from Europe as the glacial waters of the ice ages melted away and plant and animal life increased to feed the nomads. Evidence of inhabitation and exotic animal bones have been found at Victoria Cave near Settle and Kirkdale Cave near Kirkbymoorside in the Vale of Pickering. These cave dwellers were restricted to roughly shaped flint and stone tools and to date no evidence of permanent settlement has been discovered.

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Middle Stone Age Yorkshireman from the Mesolithic era visited via what is now the North Sea possibly from warmer Pyrenees or the Mediterranean about 7500 B.C. Evidence of a brushwood platform for Lake Dwelling  were found at Star Carr  near Seamer  and there was a camp at Marsden where many arrow shaft flints have been discovered. Flint axes have also been discovered in Calderdale, Blubberhouses, Glaisdale and Wharfedale and scattered on the Cleveland Hills and North Yorkshire Moors.

Neolithic man 3000 B.C. were the first farmers in Yorkshire with both cereal crops and small animal husbanding. Large trees in the fertile valleys were too difficult to clear so much of the farming was done on the tops and valley sides. There are Neolithic sites at Flamborough Head, Hartendale and Beacon Hill. Most evidence comes from the long barrows the burial mounds from Sleights to Kilburn and around Folkton. By 2000 B.C. Duggleby Howe round mound shows evidence of inhumation (interment) and cremation.

Bronze age man probably arrived from the Rhinelands about 1800 B.C. and have been named ‘Beaker Folk’ after the pots they were buried with. Burial mounds at Grassington, Baildon Moor and West Tanfield display an interest in gold and amber and the picture below demonstrates the find at Kellythorpe.

Further reading
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Are The Oldest Yorkshiremen 10,000 Years Old?

‘In July 1834 excavation of a barrow at Gristhorpe, near Scarborough, Yorkshire, recovered an intact, waterlogged, hollowed-out oak coffin containing a perfectly preserved Bronze Age skeleton that had been wrapped in an animal skin and buried with worked flints, a bronze dagger with a whalebone pommel, and a bark vessel apparently containing food residue……….’

By the Iron Age around 500 B.C. the Celts and Parisi joined the Brigantes tribes bringing expertise in metal working and even chariot building. The British museum has an Iron tyre and nave hoop from the East Yorkshire Garton Station Iron Age cart burial. The tribal atmosphere led to the building of hill forts at Ingelton, Castleton Rigg, Boltb Scar and Dane’s Dyke amongst others. These were to fall to the Romans early in the next millennia.

So this quick gallop through 10,000 years of Yorkshire folk history establishes a background for the next 2017+ years. What we don’t know is how Yorkshire folk were fairing during the 4 Ice Ages before the Palaeolithic times.

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Are The Oldest Yorkshiremen 10,000 Years Old?

Sheep in a paddock

On the road from Scarborough to Malton is Seamer, at the easterly end of the Vale of Pickering. It is here that pollen analysis and radio carbon dating have identified a site occupied circa 7,500 B.C. by Early Mesolithic Yorkshiremen.
The location is Star Carr immediately after the bridge over the River Hertford on what was the edge of prehistoric Lake Flixton .

Starr Carr Mesolithic Settlement Site south of Seamer North Yorkshire.

  • The Mesolithic period was sandwiched between the old and new Stone Ages.
  • Some archaeologists estimate that Star Carr was founded in about 8770 BC and was occupied for at least 300 years.
  • The Mesolithic period saw the introduction of stone tools, agriculture and domesticated animals.
  • ‘The remains of 21 head-dresses made of red deer antler have been found at Starr Carr. Archaeologists think they may have been used as disguises when hunting or in rituals.’
  • Waterlogged soil in the area contains peat which has helped to preserve many objects found at Star Carr.
  • Evidence of several homes and a large wooden platform have been found at Star Carr. The inhabitants probably used turf, thatch or bark for the walls, and covered the floors in plants, moss or reeds.
  • The Star Carr site is a Scheduled Monument of archaeological importance.
  • The Oldest Yorkshiremen were dated to the Mesolithic era by pollen and radio carbon dating.
  • The Starr Carr site was discovered in 1947 by a local archaeologist John Moore who found the first flint blade sticking out from a dyke.
  • The site was excavated from 1949-1951 by  Cambridge University and has been re-excavated several times since.

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Excavations At Star Carr: An Early Mesolithic Site at Seamer Near Scarborough, Yorkshire by J. G. D. Clark
‘Grahame Clark’s excavations at Star Carr from 1949 to 1951 have long been regarded as a model of how archaeological investigation should be conducted. In addition to this, the importance of the site itself has established for this report on the excavations a permanent place in all archaeological libraries’.

 

Where to see the ‘Finds’

About 17,000 worked flints and 300 cutting tools called burins were found when the site was excavated.
Some of the finds were housed at the Scarborough Museum.
Other finds have been donated to the British museum and the University Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Cambridge.

Cliffs End - flint knives 1
Modern Flints! Flint knives found in a group of tools and waste flakes in an Early Bronze Age grave circa 2000 B.C.

What do We Know About The Oldest Yorkshiremen

There is little to see other than featureless farmland as the site was buried 9 feet deep, about a foot for every thousand years! It is still worth visiting to picture the activities of our ancestors.
The seasonally occupied homes at Star Carr were used by families of hunter fisher folk.
It was a period of mildish winters and the bones of many animals included deer, ox, elk, hare, pine martins and beaver were excavated.
The hard working folk created many tools in addition to the numerous flints. They used antlers to make spear like weapons, bark for net floats, a birch wood paddle for fishing and iron pyrites flints to strike a light.
About 9,000 years ago industrious Yorkshiremen were leading the way and we are fortunate that the discoveries and pollen dating can help us understand so much about our predecessors.

Photo credits
Sheep in a paddock (at Seamer) by thsutton CC BY-NC 2.0
Scarborough’s revamped Rotunda museum by Globalism Pictures CC BY 2.0
Cliffs End – flint knives 1 by Wessex ArchaeologyCC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Further reading

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Oldest Yorkshire Folk from the Stone Age

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Fascinating Facts about Filey

‘Keep Filey litter free’ by using one of the patriotic Yorkshire rose emblemed litter bins. It seems to work as returning day trippers remarked to me how clean the town was. I couldn’t see the state of the beach as the tide was on its way to being ‘well in’ but I also got a good impression.

Historic Facts about Filey

  • The surrounding North Yorkshire moors have been inhabited for an estimated 3,000 years and the local museum has artifacts to back this up. Arrow heads and flint stones have been found locally that date from the era.
  • The Romans made it to nearby Wolds village Rudston that has a monolith in the church yard that was sacred to first pagan then christian.
  • On Filey Brigg the romans built a coastal signaling station that was excavated in the 1923.
  • Filey Brigg is a partially submerged ridge of Oolite rock that has caused many shipping mishaps including in 1932 the trawler ‘James Lay’.
  • Filey Town council was granted it’s coat of arms in 1952
  • On the promenade is a drinking fountain erected by James Varley, (hotelier), for Queen Victoria’s diamond jubilee in 1897

 

Fun Facts about Filey

  • Filey boasts (probably quite loudly) to feature the musicians the ‘Filey Ramshackle Shanty Men’ Watch out for this group, so you can avoid them!
  • Greyhounds named after Filey have run in the national track championship and are bred and eventually re-homed in the town.
  • The small Filey Museum is located in a domestic home built in 1696. It pays a leashold rent of one sea shell  per annum which due to its shape is called the Devils toenail.  The shell of  ‘Gryphaea an extinct oysters’ is donated back to the museum each year . Devilish cunning way to pay the rent next year and provide a talking point in the museum.
  • I lost count of how many ‘fish and chip’ shops and cafes there were. Unlike my home chippy the fish were fried with the skin on – still waste not want not tha knows.
  • The book I was reading on my journey featured a home called ‘Sea for Miles’  rather adapt I thought.
  • Bye names similar to nicknames but handed on have been used for fishermen and include, Chutney, Brittner, Awd Sled, Codge, Wempow and Quaft as well as more recognisable sobriquets.

Fast upon the problems with the Cleethorpes life boat that was sold on ebay and the cash stolen I hope this vessel remains in Filey. It should do as a lifeboat was first stationed here in 1804. The RNLI station is on Coble Landing.

The railway station has trains to Brid and on to Sheffield or to Seamer for York or Scarborough. It is a popular location for starting or finishing walks along the Cleveland Way from the Brigg to Helmsely 110ml or the Yorkshire Wolds Way from Filey to Hessel near Hull 79ml.

The Declaration of Yorkshire Integrity

Read annually at Filey

This declaration is read at four of York’s Bars on every 1st August Yorkshire Day and at many other events around the county.
‘Your attention please:
I (Reader’s Name) being a native of of Yorkshire declare:
That Yorkshire is three Ridings and the City of York with these boundaries of 1141 years standing’
That the address of all places in these Ridings is Yorkshire’,
That all persons born therein or resident therein and loyal to the Ridings are Yorkshire men and women,
That any person or corporate body which deliberately ignores or denies the aforementioned shall forfeit all claim to Yorkshire status.
These declarations made this Yorkshire day 2016.
Yorkshire Forever!
God Save the Queen!’
(…. followed by three cheers and alcoholic beverages).

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Fascinating Facts about the River Nidd

Old Stone Bridge

Geographic Facts

  • The river Nidd is about 50 miles long rising on Great Whernside and flowing to become a tributary of the Ouse near the site of the battle of Marston Moor. It is the fourth longest of Yorkshires nine rivers
  • The Nidd flows through Pateley Bridge, Glasshouses, Knaresborough, Summerbridge and Ripley crossing the A1 at Walshford. It is no surprise the villages and towns often include the word ‘bridge’ or ‘ford’
  • The upper valley of Nidderdale is an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.
  • The Nidd feeds three notable reservoirs, Angram, Scar House and Gouthwaite Reservoir.
  • In dry weather the Nidd can disappear underground into the sink hole known as Manchester Hole returning at Goyden Pot.
  • The Nidd Gorge  stretches from the  Nidd viaduct at Bilton to Grimbald Bridge, just south of Knaresborough. It is noted for being home to many birds, butterflies and several species of Ladybirds.

Places to visit enroute

  • Stump Cross Caverns are noted limestone caves containing formations of stalactites and stalagmites
  • How Stean Gorge is a good base for outdoor activities.
  • Brimham Rocks is an amazing collection of natural rock formations managed by the National Trust in the Nidderdale area of ONB.
  • Beningbrough Hall near the river Ouse  is home to more than 100 portraits and has extensive grounds.
  • Ripley Castle near Knaresborough is on the edge of the Yorkshire Dales National Park with a historic garden in a neat village.
  • Mother Shiptons at Knaresborough is the former home of the famous prophetess and the petrifying well . It first started charging vistors in 1630 but I bet prices have change  over almost 5oo years.
  • Moor Monkton and Nun Monkton have historic importance rather than natural or man made beauty but are worth a visit
  • The River is reputed to be good to fly fish for brown trout and grayling.
  • See Knaresborough viaduct

Cattal Bridge

Before reaching Nun Monkton and joining the Ouse, the river Nidd at Cattal is deep and quite still. This is in contrast to the crossing the Romans developed lower down stream where it was shallower and wider. This is probably where the thirteenth century ford existed.
The present bridge is just over 200 year old with 3 segmental arches with pointed cutwaters which rise to the top of the parapets.
Twice in the last 150 years large blocks of ice were brought down with spring flood water. The ice weighed over a ton and in one instance destroyed the bridge one mile up stream at Hunsingore. The Cattal bridge survived the ice which was broken up by the local blacksmith.

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Cattal in History

The Roman road that goes through Cattal runs between Tadcaster and Boroughbridge.
Cattal Bridge is one of the few places to cross the River Nidd.
In the 18th century Colonel Thornton a local landowner raised the Yorkshire Blues against the Young Pretender with the help of Blind Jack of Knaresborough. Blind Jack lost his sight after contracting smallpox aged six but became a hunter,local musician and road builder of some renown. Blind Jack was a military musician and recruiting sergeant for Colonel Thornton who led the Yorkshire Blues at Culloden.
Despite being a small village it is served by Cattal railway station, just to the north, on the Harrogate line.

Credits

Dave Bunnell showing the most common speleothems.  CC BY-SA 2.5

Old Stone Bridge by tj.blackwell CC BY-NC 2.0
DSCF3617 by Chris Parker, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

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Burneston’s Wimbledon Winner

How often have you driven through a village without pausing to look at what is happening or consider its history? I was tempted to stop at the church in Burneston by the archway over the gate. I am glad I did stop and look around this village of about 250 people which serves a wider area in many different ways.
The Woodman Inn at Burneston dates back to the late 1600’s and is a traditional country inn with cask beers and excellent food which is locally sourced. Every Wednesday night Burneston Folk Club meet here at 8.30pm. It’s a lively club with a mix of traditional, acoustic and contemporary music. Everyone is welcome, whether it is to play, sing or just listen. they do not book guests, charge an entrance fee or hold a raffle they just enjoy the music.

The church of ST. Lambert consists of a chancel with a north vestry and a square west tower. The nave probably contains the stones of the 13th century or earlier but much of the internal masonry is of early 14th-15th century. In 1086 Burneston belonged to Count Alan. At the Dissolution in 1591 Queen Elizabeth granted this manor to Sir Richard Theakston. Theakston village is less than one mile away (although the family breweries are in Masham 5 miles or so distant).

To the north-west of the church are the Robinson Almshouses, founded in 1680 by Matthew Robinson, vicar of Burneston. They form a picturesque block two stories in height, and are built of red brick. The windows are stone mullioned and of two lights

The last Yorkshireman to win the men’s singles at Wimbledon may have been John Hartley from Burneston, near Bedale in 1879. Did he live here?

Sources

History and far more detail at http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=64767

A History of the County of York North Riding: Volume 1 Author  William Page

Parish Church home page   http://kirklington.2day.ws/

Burneston Folk Club http://www.myspace.com/burnestonfolkclub

The Northern Echo library.

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Roberttown – Robin Hood and Other Highlights

My first highlight was in the 1960’s when I did some courting in the pubs of Roberttown. It wasn’t only the romance but the Chicken and Chips in a basket that made the trip worth the effort. The only alternative food and beer combo was at Bernie Inns or posh eating places without the beer.
Roberttown has a long tradition for hospitality. Stage coaches stopped at the bar house on the turnpike road but the famous footpad and highwayman ‘Swift Nick’ Nevison lurked around the area.
In the 1840’s 250,000 Chartists met on the common to protest about the economic depression (not much different then).
The Roberttown races were held over three days in midsummer and the men of the turf were accommodated at the Star and in local cottages.

The Star, Roberttown

Robin Hood Prince of Robbers

The Yorkshire Robin Hood Society, have been campaigning since the 1980’s to allow public access to Robin Hood’s Grave on the Kirklees Estate. The grave at The Priory Garden Kirklees Park is only six hundred yards from the gatehouse but it was enclosed in iron railings in the nineteenth century. Today it is neglected, overgrown and little known to the general public with access aggressively prevented by the current owners. There is a fear of unsuitable redevelopment without taking this historic site into consideration. Read more from the fascinating site of The Yorkshire Robin Hood Society.

Churches and Religion in Roberttown

All Saints, Roberttown, Liversedge
John Wesley made many visits to Roberttown to support the poor and hard working spinners and weavers. To celebrate 100 years of methodism the chaple was built in 1830.
All Saints Church was the vision of the Reverend Hammond Roberson and was consecrated in 1845.

Outward Looking Roberttown

Hartshead Village from Roberttown Lane
Two hundred years ago Robertown was a hamlet in the township of Liversedge in the parish of Birstall.
The M62 made the village a commuter area for Manchester as well as Leeds and Bradford. This is still an issue for the Campaigners from ‘Keep Roberttown & Hartshead Rural’. (This is a campaign that should be supported and taken up in other similar Yorkshire commuter hotspots.)
Foreign beers (from Lancashire) are available at the annual Bobtown Beer Festival organised by the Roadrunners

Photo Credits under CC BY 2.0
The Star, Roberttown by Tim Green aka atoach
All Saints, Roberttown, Liversedge by Tim Green aka atoach
Hartshead Village from Roberttown Lane by Fraig

 

 

Read more about Highway men and Swift Nick

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Holy Trinity Goodramgate & Charity

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A strange picture for an article on a medieval church but this church is where I bought the book ‘Bells and Bikes’.  Holy Trinity Goodramgate’s environment and a charity donation to Marie Curie encouraged me to part with some cash. I was not disappointed on either front.

As can be seen charity is nothing new at Holy Trinity. This wall mounted board records 17th century donations for bread to the poor.

The church is a marvel from 12th – 15th century worship that still has 3 services each year. It is now in the care of the historic Churches Conservation Trust.

‘The floors and arcades are charmingly uneven. Light filters through the windows, illuminating honey-coloured stone. The east window especially has marvellous stained glass that was donated in the early 1470s by the Reverend John Walker, rector of the church. On sunny days, transient gems of coloured light are scattered on the walls, and various medieval faces stare out from the windows.

The building dates chiefly from the fifteenth century, but has features from its foundation in the twelfth century right up to the nineteenth century. The box pews, unique in York, are exceptionally fine, and an interesting collection of monuments and memorials paint a picture of life in this busy city throughout the ages’.

‘The church is of interest for the evidence it retains of a complicated, piecemeal development, but it is chiefly remarkable as the best surviving example, little altered, of pre-Tractarian arrangements to provide an auditory setting for Anglican worship with three liturgical centres contrived within a mediaeval church. It has suffered badly from decay but has been restored without loss of character. Among the fittings, the mediaeval glass and the surviving woodwork of the 18th-century ordering or reordering are of particular interest.’ British History online

Church & Charity

More importantly linking the church to the book, Holy Trinity Goodramgate has a large bell suspended near the entrance that children take delight in banging with a tethered clapper. The author is a keen campanologist, native Yorkshire man and cycling obsessive. Rod Ismay is also endorsed by the post office as a superhero for Children in Need in recognition of his many cycling related fund raising activities.

Rod is quite keen on bell-ringing, charity fund raising and cycling so the book provided an opportunity to link all three. ‘ Why not get all the bells ringing along the Tour route, why not organise countless events, countless meetings, why not drag in churches far and wide, why not involve your employer, your friends, your family….’ as the amazon blurb has it.

 

One of several other historic  plaques on the church wall.

Friends Of Holy Trinity Goodramgate York registered charity no. 1096369 over the last five years has spent more than three times its annual income to finance ways of making visits to holy trinity church more pleasurable. Casting bread on waters perhaps.

See also Charity Chit Chat

It seems a shame the Bell Ringers and York Minster politicos can’t demonstrate a more effective charitable spirit and resolve the dispute that is currently keeping the Minster bells silent.

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Wetherby Interesting and Unusual Facts

Wetherby is a small market town with a Royal Charter to hold a market since 1240 AD.
It has a big riverside frontage on the Wharfe which provides visitors with interesting riverside walks, picnic areas and a free car park.
Wetherby styles itself ‘Blooming Wetherby England’s Floral Town’.

Cog and Fish 2

The Wetherby Railway Path not surprisingly runs through Wetherby (that is more than the trains do since Dr Beeching took out his axe). Now starting in Spofforth it follows the old railway track through Kirk Deighton and the railway triangle to the town centre where it is joined by the West Yorkshire Cycle Route. By now it has been named The Harland Way after the late Lions Club president. Then it has been extended to Walton Gate and Thorp Arch Estate.

Sustrans invest in Cycle paths but this route is suitable for walkers, riders and horses. It will eventually be extended to Tadcaster and York whilst the West Yorkshire cycle route heads off south.

Wetherby ... willow bull.

Interesting and Unusual History of Wetherby

  1. From 1318 to 1319 the North of England suffered many raids from the Scots. After the battle of Bannockburn Wetherby was burned and many people taken and killed. It is said that Scott Lane is so named because it ran with blood.’
  2. At nearby Bramham Moor one of the first battles in the Wars of the Roses took place in 1408.
  3. During the World War II Tockwith airfield was renamed ‘Marston Moor Airfield’ to avoid confusion with Topcliffe Airfield. Clark Gable was stationed here. Part of the airfield is now used as a driver training centre and the old control tower is used as the offices but bits of the runways can still be seen.
  4. The bridge on the Old Great North Road is a Scheduled Ancient Monument and a Grade II listed structure. As a result of its situation a large number of coaching inns, now pubs, were established in Wetherby.

Wetherby parade ring.

Interesting and Unusual History of Wetherby

  1. Over the sticks Wetherby racecourse is Yorkshire’s premier National Hunt venue and home to some of the best races in the National Hunt Calendar. It boasts some of the best facilities in the North of England and has a fantastic atmosphere to rival any sporting occasion.
  2. The town centre is full of interesting small shops selling a wide variety of goods. Mary Portas would be pleased that there are not too many multi-nationals to force the locals into homogeneous shopping. Sadly the free car park by the river is quickly filled by workers and tourists.
  3. Near by Thorp Arch Retail Park is notable as it is set in semi-underground bunkers. The British library has a large storage facility in Thorpe Arch
  4. Tadcaster and Boston Spa lie to the south-east; other villages nearby renown for executive housing include Sicklinghall and Kirkby Overblow, and Linton.
  5. Under Wetherby Attractions on the Wetherby website there are no attractions except for a list of other Yorkshire towns and villages
  6. We of course are mightily attracted to the Wetherby Whaler the home of a chain of fish and chip shops par excellence

Wetherby ... Y709 HRN TRANSDEV in Harrogate bus.
Do not drink and drive around here.

Photo credits
Cog and Fish 2 by Tim Green aka atoach CC BY 2.0
Wetherby … willow bull. by BazzaDaRambler and Wetherby … Y709 HRN TRANSDEV in Harrogate bus. by BazzaDaRambler CC BY 2.0
Wetherby parade ring. by biltho CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)
Wetherby Bridge 1 by Tim Green aka atoach CC BY 2.0

Wetherby Bridge 1

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7 Man Made Wonders of Yorkshire – Ribblehead Viaduct

Ribblehead boys (Gherkin, Wimsey, Wonky and Pickle)

Ribblehead is somewhat remote boasting only a railway station a few houses and The Station Inn. The teddybears may have a bit of a wait before they can start their picnic.
Located at the head of the River Ribble, the viaduct is firmly located in the Yorkshire Dales National Park and the hearts of many railway enthusiasts.

Ribblehead Viaduct and Weather

Ribblehead Viaduct Sunset
The Ribblehead Viaduct at sunset and behind it to the right Whernside one of the three peaks and the highest point in Yorkshire. It looks like it has been drizzling for a shortwhile but the puddles should dry up by September before it starts to rain.
A light dusting of snow can be expected in May and June but for real snow you need to visit in February or any month with an R in the name. Continue Reading →

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