London for Yorkshire Folk

London

This is t’missus swimming with Dolphins on the Thames.

Local fish and chips turned out to be Eels and mash so we didn’t recon much to that.
As for the price of Beer!!! I know this is the capital but it’s punishment.
Still near Tottenham Court Road tube the is an Angel with reasonably priced Sam Smiths in an Edwardian pub setting that hasn’t been spoilt be refurbishment for yonks.

As they say you can always tell a Yorkshireman in London – but you can’t tell him much. With all the tourists asking us for directions it was worse than York on a bank holiday.

Note Ferrets are frowned on in London but Fayed flogs fancy ferrets at Harrods.

Pubs

  • The Yorkshire Grey is a favourite pub in Fitzrovia. It’s a Sam Smith’s pub so the beers are reasonably priced and the bar staff are very pleasant for southerners and Australians.
  • The Cittie of Yorke Holborn grade ll listed Sam Smiths watering hole.
  • Duke of York  Harrowby Street Marylebone reopened in March 2017
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Corn Dolly Bradford’s Best Boozer

 

In our pagan past it was believed that the spirit of the corn lived amongst the crops and that the harvest made it effectively homeless.

Corn Spirit was supposed to live in the plaited straw  or corn doll  until the following spring to ensure a good harvest. Straw idols have been made for centuries under the name of Corn Dolls.

The idols in this Bradford pub are the landlord and his selection of beers and lunchtime banquets of pie and peas, hot beef in sandwiches or Yorkshires. You might thing the idle in the pub are tax office escapees but I couldn’t possibly comment. (It is on the old trolley bus route to the real Idle!)

Reverting to the ‘pagan’ theme this is a pagan advert for an ale at the Corn Dolly, probably brewed in the Pagan Place Pendle.

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Off to Wetherby Races

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If you are thinking of a drink on the way to or from the races, jump too it. Bear in mind that you need to be well shod at the Three Horseshoes on the Horsefair at Boroughbridge (below). The Wetherby Steeplechase was in the bar at the Grantham Arms (the painting not he race itself).

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Ure river of choice must have been bridged on Ermine Street at a place conveniently called Boroughbridge. The Great North Road was a better name than the A1 but the A1(M) is a traffic jam waiting to happen (or is that the name of my horse at Wetherby?) Continue Reading →

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Old and Very Old Yorkshire

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Well this is the colour of the dreaded European Passport so I am not sure that a Yorkshire blue would not be more appropriate. Yes I am sure. It also says God’s Own Country when we know and accept that Yorkshire is a county. Admittedly even the ridings are big enough and good enough to stand as individual countries but without the pretensions of Scotland and Ireland.

Anyway to some old business even prehistory.

Rombalds Way

The river Wharfe now flows, and at times meanders, from the source on wild moorland at Camm Fell to join the Ouse below York. It passes through an ancient area known as Mid-Wharfedale. Pre-glacial man has left little trace but from the Mesolithic age there have been many finds of stone tools. Then the new stone age or neolithic period marked a spread of civilisation.

About 2000 years ago ‘Bell Beaker folk’ came to Yorkshire from the Rhine & Russia and there are over 100 Beaker Folk graves in East Yorkshire.

On an area called Rombalds moor covering  Burley, Hawkesworth and Baildon moors plus to the south of Ilkley there are many ‘cup and ring’ carvings. The swastika stone in Ilkley, Knotties stone on the Chevin and the Panorama  stone in Ilkley are all fine examples from the Early Bronze Age

Rombalds is named after  a short lived but fabled giant who is credited in folklore with superhuman strength and feats.
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Book CoverA History of Yorkshire

Yorkshire folk aren’t big on blurb but this ‘push piece’ gives you a quick overview of what to expect in this 480 page history of our favourite county.

‘The three Ridings of Yorkshire covered about an eighth of the whole of the country, stretching from the river Tees in the north to the Humber in the south, and from the North Sea to the highest points of the Pennines. In such a large area there was a huge diversity of experience and history. Life on the Pennines or the North York Moors, for example, has always been very different from life in low-lying agricultural districts such as Holderness or the Humberhead Levels. And the fisherfolk of Staithes or Whitby might not readily recognise the accents, ways or customs of the cutlery makers of Hallamshire, still less perhaps of the farmers of Wensleydale or Craven. In some ways, this diversity makes Yorkshire the most interesting of England’s historic counties, a microcosm of the country as a whole. Its variety and beauty also help to explain why Yorkshire is now such a popular tourist desination. Until quite recently people felt that they belonged to their own local area or ‘country’. Few people travelled very far, and it was not until the late nineteenth century that the success of the Yorkshire County Cricket Club seems to have forged the idea of Yorkshire as a singular identity, and which gave its people a sense of their superiority. This single volume describes the broad sweep of Yorkshire’s history from the end of the last Ice Age up to the present day. To do so Professor Hey has had to tell the story of each particular region and of each town. He talks about farming and mining, trade and industry, fishing and ways of life in all parts of the county. Having lived, worked, researched, taught and walked in the county for many years, he has amassed an enormously detailed knowledge and understanding of Yorkshire. The fruits of his work are presented here in what has been described as ‘a bravura performance – by one of the Yorkshire’s finest historians’. With a particular emphasis on the richness of landscape, places and former ways of life, this important book is a readable, informative and fascinating overview of Yorkshire’s past and its people.’

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Mucky Fat for Your Drip Teacake

Nowt better than a bit of ‘Mucky fat’. That is the nectar of the gods that drips out of a large well cooked beef joint. When poured off it will conceal, rather than set, into two layers. The top will be a tasty float of soft fat or as some say dripping but then we get to the mucky bit. Underneath the fat will be a brown jelly like substance of beefy goodness ideal for spreading  on a breadcake, scuffler or teacake.

The best result is when a helping of fat with a scrape of brown goodness is spread on your bread of choice. Barm cake, roll, bun, oven bottom, batch, cob, stottie, softie bridie, muffin, oggie, bap or buttery will all taste better with a lashing of mucky fat.

I am prepared for this delicacy to be called a drip teacake but not as southerners may say ‘a dripping sandwich’.

 

Do not Mistake Lard  for Drip

  • Another Yorkshire staple is lard! It is a key ingredient for cooking Yorkshire puddings. Batter is best poured into hot lard and cooked until golden brown.
  • Lard is not dripping and vice versa!
  • Lard is made from pigs as dripping is make from beef.
  • Pigs may be mucky but that is just pigs for you.
  • Lardy lads may play rugby league in Ponte or at Cass but they are too big for me to say so.

 

 

 

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Thrifty Yorkshire Hoarders

 

Yorkshire folk are well known for their thrift and canny ways with money. Perhaps some of this rubbed off on our Viking visitors who first arrived around AD780.

Skip forward to 2007 when a hoard of coins and jewelry was unearthed near Harrogate. The Vikings had buried a silver -gilt cup containing 617 silver coins, silver jewelry and some 67 other pieces. As treasure trove they were valued by the coroner at over £1million and are now held in the British Museum and by York Museum Trust.

The majority of coins were Anglo Saxon but some came from around the Middle East  via the Viking trade routes of Russia, across the Baltic and Scandinavia. The hoard includes Islamic dirhams and Frankish deniers. The most modern coin was dated from the AD920’s after the Anglo Saxon king, Athelstan, conquered Northumbria in AD 927. At this time of upheaval members of York’s controlling Vikings may have wanted  safe storage (and they got that for over A THOUSAND YEARS).

It is possible that the hoard had been added too over time before being burried. Also it may have been the property of several Viking clans acting with a trusted ‘banker’.

Other Yorkshire hoards include one of over 200 coins  discovered in Flaxton and Goldsborough’s Viking silver contained 39 coins and hack-silver made from fragments of brooches and arm-rings.

West Yorkshire hoard of 5 items of 7th to 11th century Anglo Saxon gold jewellery were discovered in 2008

If you want older hoards consider the neolithic Ayton East Field Hoard or the York Hoard dated from the  30th century BC. They contain 80 flints, axes, arrow heads and tools and were discovered in the 19th century. Why they were hoarded together remains a mystery.

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Rotherham’s Serious Crimes

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  • For fourteen years Jayne Senior tried to help girls from Rotherham who had been groomed, raped, tortured, pimped and threatened with violence by sex traffickers. Only by becoming  a whistleblower, sharing confidential documents to expose the scandal for The Times investigative reporter Andrew Norfolk, was any action taken.
  • As the manager of Risky Business, which was set up to work with vulnerable teens, she heard heartbreaking and shocking stories of abuse and assiduously kept notes and details of the perpetrators, passing information on to the authorities
  • She describes a life spent working to protect Rotherham’s girls, the pressure put on her to stop rocking the boat and why she risked prison in the hope that she could help end the appalling child exploitation in the town is told in the book.
  • The report by Professor Alexis Jay said there were “collective failures” of political, police and social care leadership over the first 12 years the inquiry covered.

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  • The scale of the Rotherham child protection scandal has led professionals responsible for safeguarding children in other regions to recognise the extent of child abuse in their area
  • Drawing on lessons learned from key case reviews professionals must consider how to react and respond. Failing to take on the concerns of child sexual exploitation will lead to other Rotherhams.
  • The authors of ‘Sexual Exploitation After Rotherham’   present recommendations for improvements at strategic management and frontline practitioner levels.

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  • Violated is an uncomfortable story about the  sex abuse scandal in Rotherham that sent shockwaves through the nation.  Sarah Wilson one of many victims tells her story in the hope that other young girls will not fall prey to the same evil that she endured and that more care and responce will be provided by the powers that be.
  • Sarah was just eleven years old when she was befriended by a group of older men. She ‘escaped’ from rape and addiction when she became too old for the men at nearly sixteen.
  • Professors Jays report estimated that  up to 1,400 young girls in the town had been regularly abused by sex gangs, predominantly comprised of Pakistani men.

Book Cover Continue Reading →

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Harrogate’s Great War Terriers

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Interesting Comment and Facts about The Harrogate Terriers

  • A Roll of Honour and medal lists of 2,000 officers and men known to have served during the war to end all wars is contained in the book.
  • General Haig accused the Terriers of being “too sleepy” to fight well on the Somme
  • Excelling at the Battle of Thiepval Ridge, and then again at Passchendaele in 1917 General Haig could no longer use them as a convenient scapegoats for his own failures.
  • John Sheehan’s book ‘Harrogate Terriers’ traces individual stories of tragedy and heroism during the Great War. In the book he uses personal and military diaries, with hundreds of carefully selected newspaper extracts, letters and photographs
  • The terriers included all trades and groups including teachers, tradesmen, apprentices, lawyers, musicians, sportsmen and whole families.
  • Other battles included  the Battle of Aubers Ridge, Ypres  a rear-guard action on the Menin Road, Second Battle of Kemmel Ridge, and action at Cambrai and Valenciennes.
  • Corporal Harry Holmes from St. Mary’s Walk in Harrogate was wounded in 2015 declared missing at the Battle of The Somme where he died on 28th September 2016. For more see Harrogate Advertiser
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Seven or More Yorkshire Cathedrals and Minsters

Top Cathedrals for age and Architecture

1.York Minster Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of St Peter is the Mother church of the Province of York AD 627.

2. Ripon Cathedral Church of St Peter and St Wilfrid AD 655.

Parish and modern Cathedrals

3. Bradford Cathedral Church of St Peter 15th century

4. Leeds Roman Catholic Cathedral Church of St Anne

5. Wakefield Cathedral Church of All Saints consecrated AD 1329

6. Sheffield Cathedral Church of St Peter and St Paul  + like Liverpool with a second cathedral the 7. Roman Catholic Cathedral Church of St Marie

8. Middlesbrough  Saint Mary’s Roman Catholic originally Cathedral Church of Our Lady Of Perpetual Succour

Minster Churches not Cathedrals?

  1. Beverley Minster Parish church of St John and St Martin
  2. Dewsbury Minster All Saints Church
  3. Marsden St Bartholomew’s church
  4. Halifax Minster West Riding
  5. Howden Minster was owned by monks from Peterborough Abbey in Saxon times
  6. Leeds Minster and Parish Church of Saint Peter-at-Leeds
  7. All Saints Church, Rotherham, also known as Rotherham Minster,
  8. Doncaster Church of St George, Doncaster, also known as Doncaster Minster.

Significant or Greater Churches Network

Southwell Cathedral and Parish Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary prior to the dissolution of 1539  was a Minster in the diocese of York.

  • Bolton Abbey
  • Bridlington Priory
  • St Peter’s Church, Harrogate
  • Holy Trinity Church, Hull newly promoted to a Minster church on 13th May 2017
  • Selby Abbey

The greater church network aims to help former monastic properties and others  large parish churches built at a time of great wealth. They have common problems of financing facilities for a large number of visitors and the specialist maintenance and repair of old or large buildings.

Fascinating Facts about Yorkshires Newest Minster

  • Holy Trinity Church,Hull needed a £4.5m renovation  and the Archbishop Dr John Sentamu revealed it would become Hull Minster if the funds could be raised.
  • The largest parish church in England was newly promoted to a Minster church on 13th May 2017
  • Holy Trinity’s  mother church is All Saints in Hessle just up river.
  • The church was built in the 1300s, after King Edward I granted the former settlement  a Royal Charter for Kings Town upon Hull
  • It is the oldest brick-built building in the country still in use foor it’s original purpose.
  • Anti-slavery campaigner William Wilberforce was baptised at the church
  • The church now houses beer festivals and other activities to help raise the funds for refurbishment.
  • During World War One, the church was bombed and damage by fire and in  World War Two it became a  flight marker for the German aircraft looking to bomb the docks and city.

 

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