Sculptures New and Ancient

 

Lizards from Cornwall have been carving a path through our dry stone walls. See more sculptures around Chevin Park and Surprise View.

Human foot marks have eroded part of the Calf as folk try the ascent to the summit. Parents of small children should give their assent in a Yorkshire accent first. Around Rombolds Moor you can visit stone age cup and ring stones the Swastika and Apostle  stones.

Which sculpture takes your eye? The White Horse at Kilburn or the National Park adulterated Mill Wheel  sign.

The Grewelthorpe Duck

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The East Riding or Wolds Waggon

Leeds Art Gallery has been closed for far too long. Amongst the unviewable treasures are the historic plates by George Walker depicting working costumes and regional garb from the Ridings. They are however available in Flickr

plate 16: The East Riding or Wolds Waggon
The East Riding or Wolds Waggon

The Costume of Yorkshire in 1814,

‘The account given of this carriage by H. Strickland, Esq., in his late excellent publication on the agriculature of the East Riding of Yorkshire, is so perfectly descriptive of the annexed Plate, that we here take the liberty of quoting it verbatim.

“Little can be said in favour of the waggons which are in general use here; they are high, narrow, and long; an inconvenient form for the purposes for which they are intended, that of carrying a top-load, particularly in such parts of the country as are irregular; and they have but one peculiarity in their construction which seems worthy of more general adoption. This is a strong chain on each side of the waggon, of which one end is fixed to the back of the fore axletree, and the other to the other side of the body, of such a length as just to prevent the opposite wheel from locking against the side of the waggon in turning; by which means the body may be set much lower between the wheels, without being weakened by cutting the side to admit the wheel (as is sometimes done), and the waggon may be turned within a much smaller space. The mode of yoking appears to be a practice nearly peculiar to that district, and is deserving of imitation. The four horses are yoked two abreast, in the same manner as they are put to a coach, two drawing the splinter-bar, and two by the pole; those at the wheel also drawing by a swinging bar; which the wheel-horses of every carriage ought to do, as they thereby obtain considerable ease in their draft, and are less liable to be galled by the collar than those which draw by a fixed bar. The driver then being mounted on the near-side wheel-horse, directs the two leaders by a rein fixed to the outside of each of their bridles, they being coupled together by a strap passing from the inside of each of their bridles to the collar of the other horse. In this manner, when empty, they trot along the roads with ease and expedition; and when loaded, the horses being near their work, and conveniently placed for drawing, labour with much greater ease and effect than when placed at length. Were the waggons, indeed, of a better construction, the team would be excellent.” ‘

LEEDM.E.2013.0139.0001.plate16
plate 22: Thirty-third Regiment
Thirty-third Regiment plate 22

 

‘This Regiment was raised during the American War, in the neighbourhood of Halifax, from which circumstance, and that of their recruiting-serjeants always preceding the party with an oat-cake upon their swords, the men have always been denominated the Haver-cake Lads. Till very lately the gallant Lord Wellington was the colonel of this regiment. To his portrait the eloquent serjeant in the Plate is appealing, which, with the strong additional aid of Sir John Barleycorn, will no doubt produce a powerful reinforcement to the Haver-cake Lads. The regiment has been lately given to Sir John Sherbrooke.’

plate 12: Nor and Spell
Nor and Spell

plate 12: Nor and Spell

‘This is no doubt the same game, a little varied, which Strutt, in his Sports and Pastimes of England, denominates Northern, or Northern Spell. The little wooden ball is in Yorkshire called the Nor, and the receptacle in which is placed, the Spell. A sight of the Plate will sufficiently explain the anture of the game, which is necessarily played on an open piece of ground. Upright sticks or stones, placed at certain equal intervals of about twenty yards serve to regulate the score by determing the distance to which the ball is struck. The player uses a long stick of cane or hazle, to the end of which is fixed a thick solid piece of wood. With this instrument he raises the ball by tipping the sharp end of the spell, and strikes it while it is still in the air. Strutt describes the spell as hung upon a pivot considerably above the ground, the ball as made of leather, and much larger, and the stick as resembling in form the bat used for cricket. In short it approaches more nearly to the modern game of Trap-ball, and by no means admits of the skill requiredd in the one here represented.’

Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0)Leeds Art Gallery

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York Is Appealing

We all know that York has a wide appeal for residents and visitors but are these appeals really necessary?

This is a tale of two art related 2017 appeals .

1. The York Art Gallery

If you have £3.6 million to spare you could help acquire A Revery by Albert Moore  a 19th Century York born artist. The painting above currently features at the York Art Gallery until 1st October 2017 but the museum and gallery trust would like to buy this painting.

 Money and finance seems high on the list of priorities for the Art Gallery. Is this appeal convincing you? How many works do York own that are not on display in the City?Book CoverAmazon Kindle version of ‘43 Amazing Color Paintings of Albert Joseph Moore – British Academic Painter (September 4, 1841 – September 25, 1893)’

2. Wooden Sculptures Wooden Appeal

I have been invited to support a fund raiser to buy ‘for the nation and York’, a 17th century sculpture by Grinling Gibbons. The cost will be £300,000 and 80% has already been found from mainly public sector purses. To be more exact funds for the purchase are destined for York Civic Trust and Fairfax House an Historic House Association member. The HHA is an association of 1500 privately owned stately homes, historic dwellings, parks and gardens throughout the UK. The Civic Trust is awash with unspent investments!

Sotheby’s auctioned the lot for a price of $162,500 on behalf of the estate of A Arthur Traubman their late chairman who served time in USA prison over his role in a price-fixing scandal with Christie’s. He  was a multi-millionaire from construction and investment (peak networth $3billion). He is also known for his extensive  art collection which Sotheby’s valued at $500 million. Should the public be coughing up another £60,000 for this shemozzle?

Book Cover Lords and Liars: The Inside Story of the Sotheby’s-Christie’s Conspiracy by Christopher Mason

 

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Barnsley Food Porn

Barnsley Chops

  • Barnsley does ‘Chops’ better than it does Porn!
  • Soft juicy and succulent these Barnsley Chops are just waiting to be well and truly cooked! Cheeky chops.
  • At the local Chinese no.241 is Barnsley Chop suet – ideal for deep frying and pastry production.
  • Did you think ‘Barnsley Chop’ was a form of vasectomy? If so I am cut to the quick. Barnsley Chops are a snip at your local butchers at £5.55 a pound.
  • Are “Barnsley’s at home” is a local euphemism for menstruation.  As for bloody chops  I am not as sure but check out Doncaster NHS

Barnsley Mutton Chop Whiskers

You Know You are from Barnsley when:-

  • The fast food shop sells a Barnsley Chop  chop chop
  • Snap is something you eat.
  • You know that a bag of spice is something kids eat.
  • You judge a cafe by its black pudding, chops and gravy.
  • You consider having warm chips and chops as your birthright.
  • You call drinking water “Dearne Valley Pop” but have Barnsley Bitter with chops.
  • Your ‘five a day’ means Lyons Cakes after  chops.
  • You visit another town and they “claim” to have Barnsley Chops – but you know better.
  • Your side burns are shaped like chops
  • You’ve been busting your chops writing this post.

More Chops – no chips on chin or whiskers on the stiff upper lip

 Esther M. Zimmer Lederberg  memorial website.

Barnsley Butchers are selling Houses!
Get your car from the Barnsley Chop shop
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Pop Musicians of Yorkshire

Not all our Yorkshire musical achievements are groups or bands everyone would be proud of but we could put on a great festival from some acts on this list.

  • Def Leppard sheffield
  • Saxon barnsley
  • Robert Palmer batley
  • David Coverdale north yorkshire singer for Whitesnake and Deep purple
  • Black lace ossett
  • Jive Bunny rotherham andy pickles
  • Human league sheffield ware and marsh quit to form heaven 17
  • The Housemartins hull
  • the wedding presents
  • Pulp and Jarvis cocker sheffield common people
  • Sisters of mercy
  • Terrorvision keighley
  • Melanie Brown scary spice leeds
  • Shed Seven, seahorses york
  • Chumbawamba
  • Gareth Gates bradford
  • Artic Monkeys sheffield
  • Kaiser Chiefs guisely
  • Pigeon Detectives rothwell
  • The Cribbs wakefield
  • Corrine Bailey Rae
  • Kate Rusby
  • Housemartins
  • Richard Howley
  • Tasmin Archer
  • Kiki Dee

If your local favourite is not on this list let us know so we can update.

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Seamer Fascinating Facts

Book CoverSeamer in Recent History

  • Well  perhaps not so recent when in AD 1086 this village was known as as Semær,  Semare or more exotically Samara. The name may have been taken from Old English for ‘lake’ indeed there was a Lake Flixton at Starr Carr 10,000 years ago see oldest Yorkshireman‘.
  • In 1603 the plague raged  along  the northeast coast from Seamer, Whitby, Runswick Bay and Robin Hoods Bay. The Seamer population was decimated by this ‘Black Death’ but the village survived.
  • Six years later the King granted Seamer and the chapels of Cayton and East Ayton a market, a fair and the right to despatch immediate justice to criminals.
  •  Scarborough was not amused and a couple of years later managed to get the market closed.
  • In1644 a camp of Parliamentarian soldiers was stationed in Seamer. During the Civil War Scarborough castle switched allegiance from the Parliamentarians to the Royalists  only to be sieged by these parliamentarians.
  • By 1760 Seamer had nine inns soon to be followed by Primitive and Wesleyan chapels being erected. The wooden Saxon church had been replaced with a stone building with a tower centuries earlier.
  • Parish Council was formed in 1894.The economy of the parish was based on agriculture and there were 27 farmers recorded in 1913.
  • Since the establishment of the railway and  after the First World War the population explosion has seen an increase from 681 to now stand at 4,000and growing.
  • There is still a railway station and junction despite Dr Beeching. Trains go south towards Sheffield and westwasrd on the other line.
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Girls not on a Train

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Liverpool to Scarborough train has just dropped me at Seamer the penultimate station before the terminus – If it doesn’t stop in Scarborough then it will end up in the briny. Later in the day I return via Filey and waited an hour for a return train through York and Leeds.

Teenage Behaviour or Misbehaviour

  • I was at the end of the platform taking the snaps. Four early teenage females were acting the goat and disturbing the only other two ladies in the waiting room/shelter.
  • The teenagers bragged that they had be ‘thrown out of McDonald for amongst other things sticking a chip up someones nose’.
  • At Seamer, no doubt bolstered by earlier misdemeanor, whilst waiting for the Filey/ Bridlington train they were acting in a loud, coarse and threatening manner to the consternation of the two ladies.
  • One of the ladies took them to task in a professional manner by discussing what the future consequences of acting as they did. ‘If they wanted to have good clothes, afford a car and expected a reasonable life style they needed to work’. She went further suggesting that they had little prospects of getting a job with the attitude and disrespect they showed.
  • The lady was an HR professional at a good company in York, Paragon Creative whose products for the entertainment industry should have a lot of street cred with the girls. She told them that despite wanting to recruit young people she would not employ them even if they could do the job because their conduct was wrong.
  • The other lady remained a bit shaken. She felt if she had been alone with the teenagers she would have been frightened.

I arrived too late on the tableau and would have been ineffective as a bloke arguing with four girls could create the wrong impression. Everyone including the girls were probably glad when they got on the Sheffield bound train and we were happy to wait for the York- Liverpool bound connection.

 

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Even Older Yorkshire Folk from the Stone Age

The first Yorkshire folk were from the Palaeolithic era over 10,000 years B.C. These 12,000 year old Fred Flintstone characters were able to cross from Europe as the glacial waters of the ice ages melted away and plant and animal life increased to feed the nomads. Evidence of inhabitation and exotic animal bones have been found at Victoria Cave near Settle and Kirkdale Cave near Kirkbymoorside in the Vale of Pickering. These cave dwellers were restricted to roughly shaped flint and stone tools and to date no evidence of permanent settlement has been discovered.

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Middle Stone Age Yorkshireman from the Mesolithic era visited via what is now the North Sea possibly from warmer Pyrenees or the Mediterranean about 7500 B.C. Evidence of a brushwood platform for Lake Dwelling  were found at Star Carr  near Seamer  and there was a camp at Marsden where many arrow shaft flints have been discovered. Flint axes have also been discovered in Calderdale, Blubberhouses, Glaisdale and Wharfedale and scattered on the Cleveland Hills and North Yorkshire Moors.

Neolithic man 3000 B.C. were the first farmers in Yorkshire with both cereal crops and small animal husbanding. Large trees in the fertile valleys were too difficult to clear so much of the farming was done on the tops and valley sides. There are Neolithic sites at Flamborough Head, Hartendale and Beacon Hill. Most evidence comes from the long barrows the burial mounds from Sleights to Kilburn and around Folkton. By 2000 B.C. Duggleby Howe round mound shows evidence of inhumation (interment) and cremation.

Bronze age man probably arrived from the Rhinelands about 1800 B.C. and have been named ‘Beaker Folk’ after the pots they were buried with. Burial mounds at Grassington, Baildon Moor and West Tanfield display an interest in gold and amber and the picture below demonstrates the find at Kellythorpe.

Further reading
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Are The Oldest Yorkshiremen 10,000 Years Old?

‘In July 1834 excavation of a barrow at Gristhorpe, near Scarborough, Yorkshire, recovered an intact, waterlogged, hollowed-out oak coffin containing a perfectly preserved Bronze Age skeleton that had been wrapped in an animal skin and buried with worked flints, a bronze dagger with a whalebone pommel, and a bark vessel apparently containing food residue……….’

By the Iron Age around 500 B.C. the Celts and Parisi joined the Brigantes tribes bringing expertise in metal working and even chariot building. The British museum has an Iron tyre and nave hoop from the East Yorkshire Garton Station Iron Age cart burial. The tribal atmosphere led to the building of hill forts at Ingelton, Castleton Rigg, Boltb Scar and Dane’s Dyke amongst others. These were to fall to the Romans early in the next millennia.

So this quick gallop through 10,000 years of Yorkshire folk history establishes a background for the next 2017+ years. What we don’t know is how Yorkshire folk were fairing during the 4 Ice Ages before the Palaeolithic times.

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Are The Oldest Yorkshiremen 10,000 Years Old?

Sheep in a paddock

On the road from Scarborough to Malton is Seamer, at the easterly end of the Vale of Pickering. It is here that pollen analysis and radio carbon dating have identified a site occupied circa 7,500 B.C. by Early Mesolithic Yorkshiremen.
The location is Star Carr immediately after the bridge over the River Hertford on what was the edge of prehistoric Lake Flixton .

Starr Carr Mesolithic Settlement Site south of Seamer North Yorkshire.

  • The Mesolithic period was sandwiched between the old and new Stone Ages.
  • Some archaeologists estimate that Star Carr was founded in about 8770 BC and was occupied for at least 300 years.
  • The Mesolithic period saw the introduction of stone tools, agriculture and domesticated animals.
  • ‘The remains of 21 head-dresses made of red deer antler have been found at Starr Carr. Archaeologists think they may have been used as disguises when hunting or in rituals.’
  • Waterlogged soil in the area contains peat which has helped to preserve many objects found at Star Carr.
  • Evidence of several homes and a large wooden platform have been found at Star Carr. The inhabitants probably used turf, thatch or bark for the walls, and covered the floors in plants, moss or reeds.
  • The Star Carr site is a Scheduled Monument of archaeological importance.
  • The Oldest Yorkshiremen were dated to the Mesolithic era by pollen and radio carbon dating.
  • The Starr Carr site was discovered in 1947 by a local archaeologist John Moore who found the first flint blade sticking out from a dyke.
  • The site was excavated from 1949-1951 by  Cambridge University and has been re-excavated several times since.

Book Cover
Excavations At Star Carr: An Early Mesolithic Site at Seamer Near Scarborough, Yorkshire by J. G. D. Clark
‘Grahame Clark’s excavations at Star Carr from 1949 to 1951 have long been regarded as a model of how archaeological investigation should be conducted. In addition to this, the importance of the site itself has established for this report on the excavations a permanent place in all archaeological libraries’.

 

Where to see the ‘Finds’

About 17,000 worked flints and 300 cutting tools called burins were found when the site was excavated.
Some of the finds were housed at the Scarborough Museum.
Other finds have been donated to the British museum and the University Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Cambridge.

Cliffs End - flint knives 1
Modern Flints! Flint knives found in a group of tools and waste flakes in an Early Bronze Age grave circa 2000 B.C.

What do We Know About The Oldest Yorkshiremen

There is little to see other than featureless farmland as the site was buried 9 feet deep, about a foot for every thousand years! It is still worth visiting to picture the activities of our ancestors.
The seasonally occupied homes at Star Carr were used by families of hunter fisher folk.
It was a period of mildish winters and the bones of many animals included deer, ox, elk, hare, pine martins and beaver were excavated.
The hard working folk created many tools in addition to the numerous flints. They used antlers to make spear like weapons, bark for net floats, a birch wood paddle for fishing and iron pyrites flints to strike a light.
About 9,000 years ago industrious Yorkshiremen were leading the way and we are fortunate that the discoveries and pollen dating can help us understand so much about our predecessors.

Photo credits
Sheep in a paddock (at Seamer) by thsutton CC BY-NC 2.0
Scarborough’s revamped Rotunda museum by Globalism Pictures CC BY 2.0
Cliffs End – flint knives 1 by Wessex ArchaeologyCC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Further reading

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Oldest Yorkshire Folk from the Stone Age

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Fascinating Facts about Filey

‘Keep Filey litter free’ by using one of the patriotic Yorkshire rose emblemed litter bins. It seems to work as returning day trippers remarked to me how clean the town was. I couldn’t see the state of the beach as the tide was on its way to being ‘well in’ but I also got a good impression.

Historic Facts about Filey

  • The surrounding North Yorkshire moors have been inhabited for an estimated 3,000 years and the local museum has artifacts to back this up. Arrow heads and flint stones have been found locally that date from the era.
  • The Romans made it to nearby Wolds village Rudston that has a monolith in the church yard that was sacred to first pagan then christian.
  • On Filey Brigg the romans built a coastal signaling station that was excavated in the 1923.
  • Filey Brigg is a partially submerged ridge of Oolite rock that has caused many shipping mishaps including in 1932 the trawler ‘James Lay’.
  • Filey Town council was granted it’s coat of arms in 1952
  • On the promenade is a drinking fountain erected by James Varley, (hotelier), for Queen Victoria’s diamond jubilee in 1897

 

Fun Facts about Filey

  • Filey boasts (probably quite loudly) to feature the musicians the ‘Filey Ramshackle Shanty Men’ Watch out for this group, so you can avoid them!
  • Greyhounds named after Filey have run in the national track championship and are bred and eventually re-homed in the town.
  • The small Filey Museum is located in a domestic home built in 1696. It pays a leashold rent of one sea shell  per annum which due to its shape is called the Devils toenail.  The shell of  ‘Gryphaea an extinct oysters’ is donated back to the museum each year . Devilish cunning way to pay the rent next year and provide a talking point in the museum.
  • I lost count of how many ‘fish and chip’ shops and cafes there were. Unlike my home chippy the fish were fried with the skin on – still waste not want not tha knows.
  • The book I was reading on my journey featured a home called ‘Sea for Miles’  rather adapt I thought.
  • Bye names similar to nicknames but handed on have been used for fishermen and include, Chutney, Brittner, Awd Sled, Codge, Wempow and Quaft as well as more recognisable sobriquets.

Fast upon the problems with the Cleethorpes life boat that was sold on ebay and the cash stolen I hope this vessel remains in Filey. It should do as a lifeboat was first stationed here in 1804. The RNLI station is on Coble Landing.

The railway station has trains to Brid and on to Sheffield or to Seamer for York or Scarborough. It is a popular location for starting or finishing walks along the Cleveland Way from the Brigg to Helmsely 110ml or the Yorkshire Wolds Way from Filey to Hessel near Hull 79ml.

The Declaration of Yorkshire Integrity

Read annually at Filey

This declaration is read at four of York’s Bars on every 1st August Yorkshire Day and at many other events around the county.
‘Your attention please:
I (Reader’s Name) being a native of of Yorkshire declare:
That Yorkshire is three Ridings and the City of York with these boundaries of 1141 years standing’
That the address of all places in these Ridings is Yorkshire’,
That all persons born therein or resident therein and loyal to the Ridings are Yorkshire men and women,
That any person or corporate body which deliberately ignores or denies the aforementioned shall forfeit all claim to Yorkshire status.
These declarations made this Yorkshire day 2016.
Yorkshire Forever!
God Save the Queen!’
(…. followed by three cheers and alcoholic beverages).

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