Participation Sport

What can be flat or crown?    social or competitive?    indoor or outdoor?

What can be for cereal, soup, fruit or salad?

Bowls I hear you shout! But with the title ‘Participation Sport’ it unlikely to be a form of device for eating from a hemispherical vessel. (Bowls again!)

Team sheets from outside a West Riding Club House

One part of a team resting on their laurels

To take part it is necessary to consider appropriate clothing. Notice the varied headgear and the footwear for tramping on the hallowed and much cared for turf. It must have been spring because the green is green except for he cherry blosom. Look at it now in July it is a ‘Bowling Brown’

Some Yorkshire Bowls Organisations

  • ‘YORKSHIRE COUNTY  CROWN GREEN BOWLING ASSOCIATION was formed at a meeting in Huddersfield on Monday 15 August 1892 when representatives of Yorkshire Bowling Clubs were brought together at the initiative of the Huddersfield Cricket and Athletic Club. Representatives from Huddersfield, Ilkley, Clifton (Brighouse) Holbeck, Headingley, Chapeltown, Poternewton, Hunslet, Kirkstall, Primrose Hill, Ossett, Cleckheaton, Bradley, Dewsbury and Savile, Greenfield and Slaithwaite, were in attendance
    The first ever known Roses match between the White Rose of Yorkshire and the Red Rose of Lancashire took place one year later in 1893’
  • Yorkshire County Parks Bowls Association (YCPBA) is affiliated to British Crown Green Bowling Association (BCGBA).
    This Association was formed in 1910 and since that time participation in County Championship games, Cup competitions and Merits have been organised. The result of such action now provides a full range of events for all bowlers; male/female and ranges from Junior to Veteran status.
  • Local Yorkshire organisations arrange leagues and competitions. Sheffield Parks BA, Heavy Woollen BA, Barkstone Ash ABA, Huddersfield Royd DBA, Airedale & Wharfdale CGBA. Leeds & District CGBA amongst others.

 

 

 

 

 

More Halifax – Proud Old Fashioned Borough Market


A right gob stopper with all sorts for local jelly babies

Cosmetic improvements well sorted

Nancy Sinatra could have got her boots for walking here

Reflect on the work clothes – I fancy one of those chef’s hats and a ginghammy thingy.

 

Councils Marketing Market Blurb

‘This splendid Grade II* listed Victorian market hall was voted the best in Britain in 2008. Come and enjoy the hustle, bustle and traditional splendour of a thriving retail market with a warm and friendly atmosphere.

The impressive and historic Halifax Borough Market was built between 1891 and 1896 and was officially opened by the Duke and Duchess of York (later King George V and Queen Mary).

As a first time visitor to this award-winning market, you could be forgiven for thinking that you had stumbled on to the set of a period TV drama. Decor and atmosphere combine to create a shopping experience that just can’t be matched by mundane and soulless out-of-town supermarkets.

Alongside the outstanding traditional family butchers and fruit and vegetable stalls which have passed down through generations, are the new stall holders tempting our taste buds with a bounty of exotic produce from the continent. Nor will the markets’s fishmongers disappoint. You can treat your inner child with toffees, fudge, boiled sweets, cakes and brandy snaps. Sandwiches, pies, olives and chorizo can be found alongside haberdashers, vibrant flower shops, perfumers, leather goods, books, underwear, CDs, DVDs, hardware, fancy dress and more!

With several cafes and coffee shops where you can stop for cuppa and a butty (go on, have cake too) you can easily refuel to carry on shopping. From the exotic to the native, extravagant to inexpensive, the quality of produce on offer remains unsurpassed. The traditional splendour of Halifax Borough Market offers a real destination shopping experience.’

With the demise  of so many large and well known retail brands it is essential we support our traditional markets.

Piecehall Halifax – Grade 1 in Many Ways

The newly renovated 18th century cloth hall has to be the best in Britain. This architectural treasure has been significantly enhanced by years of effort and lots of dosh but commercially it needs reinvention.

This Morris dancing on 14th of July was an attempt to utilise the square but it only emphasises the scale of the site. Future aspirations include more Family Music, Workshops, Exhibitions and Special Events .

The resident retailers are bound to struggle without a nucleus of anchor businesses that attract regular and sustained footfall. Many of the current units are occupied by aspirational but twee lifestylers. Where are the replacement cloth merchants and innovators able to help the commercial drive and reinvention process.

Structural Changes

The rills (below) look enticing and provide movement and a place for toddlers to splash around. The seating on stone blocks provides a viewing platform whilst softer seats are available at cafes and coffee shops. The new toilets are first class and the addition of lifts to this old building helps the infirm and weary.

Halifax is alive and well but needs regular support to remain vibrant and a grade 1 Yorkshire destination

Wapentake – Danish Pastry?

Yorkshire is renown for being divided into three Ridings, East, North and West. A Riding was derived from the Scandinavian word “thriding,” meaning a third part. The Danes had another smaller division called a Wapentake.

According to the new Leeds Cafe bar and bakery ‘the word may be derived from an assembly or meeting place, usually at a cross-roads or near a river, where literally one’s presence or a vote was taken by a show of weapons, where-in after a night of merriment would ensue.’ Perhaps a more feasible reference was to voting in an assembly by a show of weapons, a Danish tradition.

Wapentakes were shown on the map created for the replica doomsday book

Book Cover

Photos Yorkshire Dales with Dusting of Snow

In April of this year, it snowed in the middle of quite a warm spring. The snow stayed on the hill tops for the next couple of days, despite the spring sunshine. It created a great new vista of the Lower Wharfedale valley.

 

Yorkshire Dales

Lower Wharfedale

P1040248

The climb out of Burnsall

 

Yorkshire Dales

A nice day in the Yorkshire Dales

Yorkshire Dales

Clouding over

Yorkshire Dales

Moorland

Continue reading Photos Yorkshire Dales with Dusting of Snow

Gingerbread or Parkin

Parkin and Gingerbread are two famous Yorkshire favourites with their own local recipes and variations. Which do you prefer? Perhaps like me are you partial to a bit of both?

Book Cover

Gingerbread distinguishes itself with golden syrup and brandy in a Wakefeild concoction that sounds almost too good to be true. In North Yorkshire the Startforth version of gingerbread in the book ”Yorkshire Teatime Recipes’ uses black treacle, brown sugar and a good pinch of bicarbonate of soda plus the usual suspects. Bi-carb dates from the 19th century when it was first used for aeration to produce light cakes.

Parkin is a Yorkshire favourite containing oats or oatmeal and in my favourite versions with far more ginger than in gingerbread. Sticky Parkin was made by my mother in law but I hanker for the fresh irresistible parkin made by my own mum. I can’t be waiting a week or so before sticky parkin has matured in a tin to become truly sticky.

Rhubarb Gingerbread has the normal attributes of it’s kind with the added attraction of a layer of crystallised ginger and rhubarb pieces like a rhubarb sandwich. Wakefield, the home of the rhubarb triangle, has its own local version of gingerbread worth tracking down in a local cafe.

I tried to drop subtle hints in the last paragraph combined with the absence of full recipes which could be found in the amazon book. Why bake yourself? Instead, enjoy yourself tracking down as many varieties of homemade gingerbread and parkin in tea rooms and cafes around the county. You could be in for a ‘reet treat’!

Ginger Sponge and ‘Soggy Moggy’  are variations on the theme which can combine elements the products above. I like a bit of plain cake containing a generous portion of dried ginger, I’ll leave the fresh ginger to others.

To go with custard, a good Ginger Pudding can’t be beaten especially if there is some golden syrup at the bottom of the pud. I don’t think I have ever had a ginger suet pudding but now there is an idea for the chef to ginger up desserts.

 

 

Count Your Chickens at Meanwood Valley Urban Farm

Easter Chickens at MVUF

Over the last five or six years the Farm (MVUF) has been fortunate to have support from second year Events Management students at Leeds Beckett University.  For 2018 they wonder if we might help with promoting the event?
Please could you pass on the details to your family and friends and perhaps display the poster on your work or community noticeboard, even better turn up between 10.30 and 15.00. Some of your old favourite activities including  eggciting Easter egg hunts, whack the rat, beat the goalie, face painting, crafts and a raffle will probably be rehatched so scramble down to the farm on the last day of March 2018.
All the usual animals should be on show for what is set to be a cracking Easter and a very Good Friday! You can also wear your best Easter Bonnet or’ titfa’ in honour of Brain Tumour Awareness one day late will not matter.

Tilting at Yorkshire Windmills

Firstly we exclude the modern wind farms, wind turbines and their ilk designed for energy production and despoiling  the landscape. Windmill has the clue in the name, a mill that uses wind!

Which area of the county has the greatest number of windmills and a tradition of maintaining them? In York there are 23, Beverly 19,  and the surprise Hull with 29. There are fewer in the West Riding but do not ignore 4 at Aberford and Barwick in Elmet. Information from Watermill World

Perhaps Hull is not so surprising with its port and connections with Holland. Maud Foster Mill, notionally in Lincolnshire is an English tower mill was built in 1819 for the Reckitt brithers who at the time were corn factors. Their milling and baking then launched the Hull based business of Reckitt and Coleman as suppliers of starch.

Every organisation or interest group seems to have a national day and Windmills have coined two days in 2018 to promote their preservation. National Mills Weekend will be on Saturday 12th and Sunday 13th May 2018 and includes watermills. Part of The charity ‘Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB) reg no. 1113753.